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Friday, August 29, 2014

19-Year-Old Pedophile Has Never Gone Near A Child.


This 19-Year-Old Pedophile Has Never Gone Near A Child. And He Needs You To Hear His Story.
"This American Life" decided to take on a REALLY hard topic: pedophilia. As a parent of two young kids, just hearing the word triggers a rage in me that I didn't even know I had. This is a hard episode to listen to, but it's really important that you do. Listen to it at work when you are bored at lunch, in your car, wherever. Just please hit "Play."

The definition of pedophilia is "a psychiatric disorder in which an adult or older adolescent experiences a primary or exclusive sexual attraction to prepubescent children, generally age 11 years or younger."

Note how I emphasized "attraction." To be a pedophile, you don't have to act on your urges. Just thinking them is enough. Which makes sense. The thing is, though, this attraction can start manifesting in kids as young as 12 or 13. And they have no way to talk about these urges or how to prevent them from taking control of their lives without being considered a threat. Talk to a shrink? You risk being reported to the authorities. The scientific community is so afraid of the stigma attached to even researching pedophilia that it's barely been studied it at all. Which seems like kind of a bad idea if we want to prevent the victimization of more young children.

So a 19-year-old kid, an admitted pedophile who has never acted on his impulses, started an online support group. His mom is helping him find solutions. He needs you to hear this, for the sake of your own kids.

"This American Life" was expecting lots of hate mail for this episode. So far, they've received none. It's a really good look at a really hard issue. So please listen. Also, directly from Ira, "Though there's nothing graphic in this story at all, victims of child sexual abuse should consider this a trigger warning."
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"This American Life" is the best podcast on the Interwebs. If I were you, I'd Like them on Facebook.

Reporter Luke Malone spent a year and a half speaking and meeting with members of the support group. You can ask him any questions you might have via Twitter, @bylukemalone, and use hashtag #TarredTAL.

More importantly, if you could tweet and share this so we can prove that audio stories about important and complicated issues can reach a wide audience, I'd owe you one. It's a really painful issue, but it needs to be addressed.

Most importantly, if you have children, the reality is that not all pedophiles are like this guy. So here's a really good article about how to talk to them about it.
--------------
UPDATE 8/18/2014: The reporter, Luke Malone, has just published a far more in depth piece, which includes others like Adam.

TRIGGER WARNING: The piece includes an EXTREMELY GRAPHIC description of a horrific act of abuse on a toddler in the first 4 paragraphs. Additionally, there's more detail in the 4th paragraph of the 3rd section (next to the illustration of a boys head and a house inside it.) I cried reading it and then felt extremely violently angry. But I kept reading. It's hard. But important. Click here to go to the piece.

Please consider this a warning, and I encourage you to keep reading everything after it, so we can do more to make sure things like that never happen again. Matter, the publication that the work appears in, has written a lengthy explanation about why they decided to run it.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Hysteria Over Sexting Reaches Peak Absurdity

Hysteria Over Sexting Reaches Peak Absurdity
A judge in Virginia granted a warrant for police to take a picture of a 17-year-old's erect penis—an extreme adult reaction to teenage sexuality.
Conor Friedersdorf


A 17-year-old boy is forced by adults to submit to an injection that makes his penis erect. The adults command him to strip and photograph his genitals against his will. I am not describing the twisted crime of a registered sex offender. Incredibly, that was the scenario that prosecutors in Prince William County hoped to arrange or persuaded a judge that they hoped to arrange, according to reports in the Washington Post and at an NBC News affiliate. The boy was already forced to let law enforcement photograph his flaccid penis, the articles add.


What alleged crime ostensibly justifies this most intrusive and traumatizing investigation? The teen’s lawyer, Jessica Harbeson Foster, spoke to the newspaper: "Foster said the case began when the teen’s 15-year-old girlfriend sent photos of herself to the 17-year-old, who in turn sent her the video in question. The girl has not been charged, and her mother filed a complaint about the boy’s video."

The crime of which he stands accused?

"Two felony charges, for possession of child pornography and manufacturing child pornography, which could lead not only to incarceration until he’s 21, but inclusion on the state sex offender data base for, possibly, the rest of his life," the Post reports. 

After these press reports began appearing, law enforcement issued a carefully worded statement that doesn't actually contradict the attorney's version of events. "It is not the policy of the Manassas City Police or the Commonwealth Attorney’s Office to authorize invasive search procedures of suspects in cases of this nature and no such procedures have been conducted in this case," the statement asserts. "Beyond that, neither the Police Department nor the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office discusses evidentiary matters prior to court hearings."

This would seem to leave open a couple of possibilities: that while it is not policy to induce erections in cases like this, there have been efforts make an exception in this case (everyone agrees that no such procedure has happened yet); or alternatively, authorities never actually intended to photograph the boy's erect penis, but threatened him with the scenario to coerce him into pleading guilty to avoid it. 

The Associated Press cleared up some of the confusion today:

On Thursday, Manassas Police Lt. Brian Larkin said the Police Department will not proceed with the plan to take the pictures and will let a search warrant authorizing the photos to expire... The teen's aunt, who serves as his legal guardian, said she had not heard of the police department's reversal until contacted by an Associated Press reporter Thursday afternoon. She said she would be ecstatic if police follow through on their statement that they will no longer pursue the photos. 

So a judge evidently signed off on a warrant to photograph the induced erection of a teenage boy! If ever there were a reason short of fabricating evidence to mount a recall campaign against a judge and a district attorney's office this would be it.

The earlier police statement said this of the crime in question: 
On January 23, 2014 Manassas City Police was contacted by a parent of a 15 YOA female juvenile who was sent pornographic videos by a 17 YOA male suspect after repeatedly being told to stop. 

Ambiguous is whether the 15-year-old or the parent told the 17-year-old to stop and what language was used. All of these facts would be useful to know, and it could be that the teen is guilty of harassing his girlfriend with sexual photographs.

But to charge a boy with distributing child pornography for sending images of his own penis to a girlfriend who herself reportedly sent naked pictures to him is absurd. It equates exhibitionism with one of the most unspeakable crimes in existence: adults raping or molesting children, recording the encounters, and distributing them. The utility and justness of sex offender registries declines rather quickly when kids engaged in sexting are listed alongside perpetrators of the latter crime.

Virtually no parent wants their 15-year-old daughter getting sexually explicit videos sent to her under any circumstances, and least of all if she asks her boyfriend to stop sending them, as could have happened in this case. One could hardly complain if the mother took her daughter's phone, blocked the boy from calling, and contacted his parents, and it's even possible to imagine more extreme circumstances in which a restraining order could be justified. But distributing child pornography? Those laws were not written with sexting in mind.

Emily Bazelon has a characteristically lucid take:

Maybe there is more to this story, and it will turn out that what this boy did is creepier than it now appears. But the question of consent should be key here. States are all over the map on how to handle teen sexting. What they should do is distinguish between consensual sexting, and (especially) sending out an image of someone who would not want that picture or video to circulate, or to someone who does not wish to receive it. As I’ve written before, “It’s not that the first kind of sexting is a good idea—it’s that kids shouldn’t get caught up in the criminal justice system for it, whereas nonconsensual sexting is a different story.”

If prosecutors want to take the position that great harm is done when a child's penis is photographed, even by the child himself, their investigation already seem likely to have caused more trauma than the original crime. It's good that they've been pressured into backing off their bizarre plan. But they should still be held accountable.

Child Sexual Abuse: The Sources of Anxiety Making and the Negative Effects Arnold Veraa, PhD

Child Sexual Abuse: The Sources of Anxiety Making and the Negative Effects Arnold Veraa, PhD

The Sex Abuse Industry and the American Police State The Science of Sex Abuse. By Rachel Avi

The Sex Abuse Industry and the American Police State The Science of Sex Abuse. By Rachel Avi


Sunday, August 24, 2014

cybertraps for the young

Approaching the risks for children on the Internet in a thought-provoking and intellectual manner, this study skillfully integrates contemporary news reports and disturbing legal cases to show how Facebook and other ready-made forums for information exchange are breaking down boundaries of privacy and facilitating a growing number of criminal convictions for cyberbullying, child pornography, hacking, and copyright infringement. Also included is a discussion of how the widespread use of camera phones, mobile tablets, and social media sites has given rise to a new and dangerous practice among teens: sexting. This reference provides parents with an authoritative lesson in cyberethics and practical instructions for instituting household internet policies, as well as school officials and communities with lessons on how to educate children about the responsible use of emerging mobile technologies.

cybertraps for the young

IFPI's child porn strategy, by Christian Engström


IFPI's child porn strategy
 by Christian Engström 


IFPI's lawyer Johan Schlüter (portrait by Mads Rye)


"Child pornography is great," the speaker at the podium Declared enthusiastically. "It is great Because politicians understand child pornography. That by playing card, we can get them to act, and start blocking sites. And once They have done that, we can get them to start blocking file sharing sites ".

The venue was a seminar organized by the American Chamber of Commerce in Stockholm on May 27, 2007, under the title "Sweden - A Safe Haven for Pirates?". The speaker was Johan Schlüter from the Danish Anti- Piracy Group , a lobby organization for the music and film industry associations, like IFPI and others.

I was there together with two other pirates, Pirate Party leader Rick Falkvinge , and veteran Internet activist Oscar Swartz . Oscar wrote a column about the seminar in Computer Sweden just after it had happened. Rick blogged about itlater, and so did I . (All links in English.)

"One day we will have a giant filter That we developement in Close Cooperation with IFPI and MPA. We Continuously monitor the child porn on the net, to show the politicians That filtering works. Child porn is an issue They understand, "Johan Schlüter said with a grin, his whole being radiating pride and enthusiasm from the podium.

And seen from the perspective of the IFPI and the Rest of the copyright lobby, he of course had every reason to feel proud and enthusiastic bothering, after the success he had had with this strategy in Denmark.

Today, the file sharing site The Pirate Bay is blocked by all major Internet service providers in Denmark. The strategy explained by Mr. Schlüter worked like clockwork.

Start with child porn, Which everybody AGREES ice revolting, and find some politicians who want to Appear like They are doing something. Never mind That the blocking As such is ridiculously easy to circumvent in less than 10 seconds. The purpose at this stage is only to get the politicians and the general public to accept the principle That censorship in the form of "filters" is okay. Once That principle has been Established, it is easy to Extend it to other areas, Such as illegal filesharing. And once censorship of the Internet has been accepted in principle, They can start looking at ways to make it more Technically Difficult to circumvent.

In Sweden , the copyright lobby tried exactly the same tactic a couple of months after the seminar where Johan Schlüter had been speaking. In July 2007, the Swedish police was planning to add The Pirate Bay To The English list of alleged child pornography sites, thats are blocked by most major Swedish ISPs.

The police made ​​no attempt whatsoever at contacting anybody from The Pirate Bay, Which They of course Should have done if They had actually found any links to illegal pictures of sexual child abuse. The plan was to just censor the site, and at the sametime create a guilt-by-association link between file sharing and child porn.

In the Swedish case, the plan backfired When The updated censorship list leaked before it was put into effect. After an uproar in the bloggosphere, the Swedish police Eventually was forced to back down from the claim That They had found illegal child abuse pictures, or had any other legal basis for censoring the file sharing site. Unlike in Denmark, The Pirate Bay is not censored in Sweden today.

But The copyright lobby never gives up. If They are unable to get What they want on the national level, They Will try through the EU, and vice versa.

The big film and record companies want censorship of the Net, and They are perfectly willing to cynically use child porn as an excuse to get it. They all needed was a politician who was prepared to do Their bidding, without spending too much effort on checking facts, or reflecting on the wisdom of Introducing censorship on the net.

Unfortunately They found one in the newly appointed Swedish EU commissioner Cecilia Malmström. In March 2010 she presented an EU directive to Introduce filtering of the Net, exactly along the lines That to Johan Schlüter was advocating in his speech at the seminar in in 2007.

I surmise That commissioner Malmstrom's motives are honorable, and That she genuinely believes she is doing something good that will preventable sexual child abuse. But sweeping a problem under the carpet, or hiding it behind filters, can never be the proper solution. If there actually are sites Distributing pictures of sexual child abuse openly on the net, the sites Should be shut down and the people behind them Should be put in prison (after a proper trial). But Cecilia Malmström 's Internet censorship directive will have no effect at all on sexual child abuse in the world. All She will have Achieved if she is successful with this directive, I will pray to legitimize the principle of Internet censorship in Europe, just like the copyright lobby wanted her to.

It would be very sad if she Succeeds.

Music industry spokesman loves child porn, by Cory Doctorow


Music industry spokesman loves child pornby Cory Doctorow

A music-industry speaker at an American Chamber of Commerce event in Stockholm waxed enthusiastic about child porn, because it serves as the perfect excuse for network censorship, and once you've got a child-porn filter, you can censor anything: "Child pornography is great," the speaker at the podium declared enthusiastically. "It is great because politicians understand child pornography. By playing that card, we can get them to act, and start blocking sites. And once they have done that, we can get them to start blocking file sharing sites".


The venue was a seminar organized by the American Chamber of Commerce in Stockholm on May 27, 2007, under the title "Sweden -- A Safe Haven for Pirates?". The speaker was Johan Schlüter from the Danish Anti-Piracy Group, a lobby organization for the music and film industry associations, like IFPI and others...

"One day we will have a giant filter that we develop in close cooperation with IFPI and MPA. We continuously monitor the child porn on the net, to show the politicians that filtering works. Child porn is an issue they understand," Johan Schlüter said with a grin, his whole being radiating pride and enthusiasm from the podium.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Fourth Straight Federal Court Rules Publicly Shared P2P Data Has No Privacy Rights


Fourth Straight Federal Court Rules Publicly Shared P2P Data Has No Privacy Rights

If you chose to open your data to the public, it is "open and obvious" to law enforcement
In one episode of the long-running reality TV show cops, an officer approaches a person whose car is parked in the street. The sleeping man awakens and the officer asks if he has taken drugs. The man denies that of course. And the cop asks him if he's sure, and says "Then what's that?"


The camera pans down, and sitting on his lap is a bag of powdered drugs. The groggy suspect looks down and his face suddenly transforms into a look of shocked recollection as if to say "how did I forget THAT was there?" "Oh SH-T!" he exclaims.

I. Open and Obvious for the Digital Age

This textbook example of open and obvious illustrates in the offline world the kinds of cases in which a police officer can search your property and person without warrant.

In the digital case, despite the mess of technically ignorant and overreaching laws, one bright point is that a relatively reasonably "open and obvious" analogy is being adopted for law enforcement. Federal courts in the 11th Circuit, 10th Circuit, 8th Circuit, and now 2nd Circuit (namely, the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont) have ruled that the Fourth Amendment protection against warrantless searches does not apply to digital content made publicly available by a suspect.

While cybercrime requires courts to develop a level of tech savvy, many principles of offline law enforcement can still be reasonably applied. [Image Source: TechieNews]Namely, the case in question deals with Derek Thomas, Douglas Neale, and Stephan Leiker -- a trio that stands accused of sharing child pornography via publicly available torrents.


The lawyers for the defendants in the case sought a relatively creative, although questionable defense claiming that law enforcement officers' search violated their Fourth Amendment rights by inspecting "private" files on their clients' computers. They asked a federal judge to suppress that evidence -- which in turn could allow the suppression other evidence potentially found after investigators obtained warrants based on the probable cause incited by these shared files.

II. Evidence is Admissible if Collected From Publicly Available Materials

In the end, the defense never quite explained how files made publicly available from torrents could constitute anything but an open and obvious piece of digital property. Predictably District Court Judge Christina Reiss denied the motion ruling that the suspects had given up their right to privacy when they made their information publicly available to the internet.

USDC Chief Judge Christina Reiss presides over her court. [Image Source: Burlington Freepress]

She writes:

Defendants conveyed certain information to the public when they used peer-to­-peer file sharing software and made certain files available for sharin

Because there is no evidence that law enforcement's use of automated software reached information on Defendants' computers that was not made available for sharing by the public, Defendants' motions to suppress on the basis of a warrantless search in violation of the Fourth Amendment must be DENIED.

The investigators used a piece of software by TLO plc dubbed the Child Protection System (CPS), which searches public torrent hosting sites for terms that might relate to child pornography. Once a positive hit has been verified the tool investigates the site where the torrent was posted (as most major torrent sites like The Pirate Bay remove such links, child pornography torrents are typically hosted by individuals actively involved in criminal child pornography) and records the "IP address, the files' hash values, the actual file names, date and time of response, and other computer detail" according to a blog by Sophos plc.

BitTorrent is the world's most popular means of filesharing, with the death of older proprietary P2P networks (such as Limewire and Kazaa) due to legal issues. BitTorrent is estimated to account for 3.35 percent of total global internet traffic and is used by over 150 million people. Unfortunately, a small minority exploits the popular filesharing protocol to distribute abusive content, such as videos of murder, rape, or child abuse.

BitTorrent downloads are controlled by trackers which are downloaded along with other file metadata by a user. This metadata typically includes the file's cryptographic hash (which uniquely identifies it) and a brief description, including keywords.

The investigators in the Vermont case used a piece of software by TLO plc dubbed the Child Protection System (CPS), which searches public torrent hosting sites for terms that might relate to child pornography. The Judge in the case offers a fairly sound technical description of the tool, stating:
This software is designed to replace the searches that were previously done manually by law enforcement and the public. The software reports information that is discoverable by the general public using publicly available P2P software.She rejected the defense's complaints that the tool was automated and proprietary as she pointed out that a manual search -- no matter how time-consuming -- would have yielded identical results.

III. Automated Tools are a Valid Means of Fighting Child Pornography

From a technical standpoint CPS and similar tools first scan large blocks of IPs or alternative crawl indexed lists of web addresses via indexed content sources like Google Inc.'s (GOOG) search. When torrents are encountered, the metadata is inspected for the keyword terms denoting illegal content. 

Investigators then inspect the file to determine that it's indeed illegal content, not a false positive. Once confirmed, the tool downloads the torrent and proceeds to ping the users listed by the tracker to see if they have a shared file mashing the hash, as per the standard BitTorrent protocol. After collecting these IPs, the tool then logs off without downloading the file.

Be aware of what you share. Sharing is caring, but if you share something publicly, you reveal that you possess that thing. If that thing happens to be illegal, you may be in trouble. [Image Source: KSWP]In this case each of the suspects was verified to be openly sharing files whose hash exactly matched the confirmed file depicting child pornography. Subsequently search warrants were obtained and more child pornography was found on the suspects' computers.


The outcome is "the same as probably 50 other cases", according to John Wesley Hall, a criminal defense lawyer, who maintains the Fourth Amendment blog. He notes:
The only thing that's surprising to me is that people still raise that issue. It's a settled issue beyond peradventure as far as I'm concerned.

IV. The Devil is in the Details -- So Tread Lightly

A couple of key points to note to put the ruling in context follow.

First, it's been established by some responsible, tech-literate federal judges that an internet protocol (IP) address does not uniquely identify a person or user. If this were the only evidence against a plaintiff, then the defense would have a much stronger argument. But unfortunately for the defense, their clients' seized computers contained pornographic files. Barring signs of tampering, that's about as conclusive a law enforcement finding as can be.

While activity on an IP does not clearly imply guilt by a specific person, it is a fair reason for probable cause. [Sen. Collins]The distinction between initial suspicion and confirmation that the suspect has illegal materials is important as some law enforcement officers have behaved inexcusably during the warranted search phase in past cases, manhandling homeowners, only to finding the illegal content was downloaded by a cybersquatter who was piggybacking on their network. In such cases, the warrant and search seemed reasonable, but the execution proved troubling, as the officers actions seemed indicative of a false assumption of guilt that was by no means justified by mere IP verification.


Some might say, "secure your networks", but it's important to remember thatmany forms of popular network encryption are easily crackable. Thus it's inexcusable to assume that a user with an average degree of tech savvy can completely secure their wireless networks from advanced users. That makes the "innocent until proven guilty" paradigm all the more important.

Second, there's a big difference between a public law enforcement entity collecting records of users who share criminal content and a private entity collecting information on users who share copyrighted content. In the latter case the typical goals is to collect a list of internet subscribers to try to extort money from with threat letters.

There's a massive difference between responsible law enforcement and extortion schemes designed around unproven allegations of copyright infringement. [Image Source: Sodahead]The latter tactics are highly questionable, as the private enforcement groups involved typically make little to no effort to verify that the person receiving the threats (the network owner) actually engaged in the content. Further theyalmost never (save for a few rare occurrences) take their targets to court, so there's no real due process.


Further, such efforts often operate under the false premise that making available is akin to sharing. Making available simply means you have the content. The Vermont case gets this correct, as the men were charged with the possession of child pornography. If a file is illegal, often you shouldn't be in possession of it. 

But the offense is possessing the file, not sharing it as it's impossible to determine in most cases whether a user's data was access via filesharing, much less how many users a certain user ultimately shared pieces of a file with. As copyright extortion typically focuses on the act of sharing to balloon the amount of damages is sought, it's typically founded on a fallacious and technically ignorant premise.

Last, but not least there is clearly a distinction between encrypted, unshared data -- which is not open or obvious -- and unencrypted, publicly shared data. Hopefully law enforcement and the courts recognize and respect that distinction.


Thursday, August 21, 2014

RIAA: Child porn rife on P2P networks By Declan McCullagh Staff Writer, CNET News


RIAA: Child porn rife on P2P networks
By Declan McCullagh Staff Writer, CNET News
The Recording Industry Association of America appears to be expanding its fight against online piracy by encouraging a legislative crackdown on peer-to-peer networks, warning they are infested with child pornography.


On Tuesday, one day after filing the landmark series of lawsuits, RIAA President Cary Sherman cautioned the U.S. Senate that Kazaa could be a tool for adults to lure children into having sex. A pedophile could send "an instant message to the unwitting young person who downloads an Olsen twins or Pokemon file from the pedophile's share folder on Kazaa," Sherman said.

A government report released in March, Sherman said, concluded that "a significant percentage of the files available to these 13 million new users per month are pornography, including child pornography."

Sherman's remarks to the Senate Judiciary committee, which held a hearing devoted to pornography on peer-to-peer networks, were buttressed by similar testimony from a top official in the U.S. Department of Justice's criminal division.

John Malcom, a deputy assistant attorney general, said that "P2P networks are of significant law enforcement concern and focus, particularly because of their decentralized design and relative accessibility and ease of use...(The FBI) is currently considering a protocol for investigating child pornography cases in the relatively new area of P2P technology."

But Malcolm acknowledged that the Justice Department is even more focused on child pornography on Internet Relay Chat (IRC) networks, which can be more fluid and secretive than P2P networks. "Using IRCs, a child pornographer can increase the size and diversity of his collection, which collectors of child pornography characteristically and compulsively seek to do," Malcolm said. "By contrast, offering files on P2P does not automatically result in receiving files in return."

Operators of P2P networks angrily dismissed charges of rampant child porn swapping as an attempt by the major record labels to smear a useful and popular technology.

Alan Morris, executive vice president of Sharman Networks, which distributes the Kazaa software, claimed the RIAA was on a "deliberate campaign to try to smear P2P technology itself" after it lost a key legal battle in April when a federal judge in Los Angeles rejected a request to shut down P2P networks.

"We are dedicated to the eradication of child pornography from P2P networks and will continue to cooperate with Congress, law enforcement agencies and dedicated nongovernmental agencies in support of that shared goal," Morris said.

This isn't the first time that Congress has targeted P2P pornography. During a House of Representatives hearing in March, politicians said new laws aimed at restricting pornography on P2P networks might be necessary. Also on Tuesday, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., held a press conference to urge a federal crackdown on P2P child pornography.

The subtext of Tuesday's hearing was the ongoing controversy over the RIAA's attempts to sue individual P2P users--and, especially, the legal mechanisms the trade association used to obtain alleged infringer's names under an unusual subpoena process authorized by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Verizon Communications' general counsel complained that the subpoenas would be abused by "parties far less responsible than the recording or movie industries," while the RIAA's Sherman said that Congress had crafted "a fair and balanced procedure" when voting for the DMCA in 1998.

Verizon sought to defend itself against a pair of DMCA subpoenas filed by the RIAA and was trounced in a strongly worded opinion written by a federal judge. It has turned over its subscribers' names but appealed the decision in a second attempt to persuade the courts that the DMCA is problematic.

Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy, the senior Democrat on the Judiciary committee, acknowledged that the RIAA's use of the subpoenas raised "legitimate concerns for some," but did not go so far as to say that he wanted to rewrite the law. "These problems are best solved by the groups most closely involved," Leahy said.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Porn-surfing feds blame boredom, lack of work for misbehavior, By Jim McElhatton


Porn-surfing feds blame boredom, lack of work for misbehavior
By Jim McElhatton - The Washington Times - Thursday, July 31, 2014

For one Federal Communications Commission worker, his porn habit at work was easy to explain: Things were slow, he told investigators, so he perused it “out of boredom” — for up to eight hours each week.

Lack of work has emerged time and again in federal investigations, and it’s not just porn, nor is it confined to the FCC. Across government, employees caught wasting time at work say they simply didn’t have enough work to do, according to investigation records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.

“He stated he is aware it is against government rules and regulations, but he often does not have enough work to do and has free time,” investigators wrote of another federal employee, this one at the Treasury Department, who viewed more than 13,000 pornographic images in a six-week span.

Investigations at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Commerce Department and the General Services Administration have turned up similar cases, though memos show the employees rarely face criminal prosecution for time and attendance fraud.
U.S. Gains 209K Jobs, July Unemployment Rate 6.2%

Aug. 1 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg’s Peter Cook breaks down the July employment report as the U.S. Unemployment rate climbed to 6.2 percent on 209,000 jobs added for the month. He speaks on “In The Loop.”

A spokesman for the FCC declined to comment on what, if any, action the agency took after the FCC’s inspector general singled out the eight-hour-a-week porn peeper.

FCC spokesman Mark Wigfield said only that the agency follows Office of Personnel Management guidelines on disciplinary matters and officials could not comment on specific cases.

In another recent case, a GSA employee who spent about two hours a day on a computer looking at pornography and dating sites “sometimes became bored during these long hours at the computer and would often use the computer for personal use to pass the time,” according to a case report by the GSA inspector general last year.

In a more recent and far more costly example, U.S. Patent Trial and Appeal Board paralegals received salaries and bonuses for years even though they spent much of their time watching television, shopping online, exercising and wasting time on their tablet computers, according to an investigation released this week by the Commerce Department’s inspector general. Investigators estimate that more than $4 million was spent paying employees for time they weren’t working.

The paralegals, who can’t create their own work, later told investigators that the reason was simple: Supervisors weren’t giving them any assignments. Some supervisors were reluctant to give paralegals special projects out of fear that the assignments could antagonize the labor union.

Brian Miller, a former GSA inspector general who is now managing director of the consulting firm Navigant, said executives may feel reluctant to let go of employees.

“Today, federal managers are under many constraints,” he said. “With hiring freezes and budget limitations, a federal manager may hoard resources, squirreling them away for fear of losing even unneeded resources.

“It takes a very strong manager to stand up and do the unpopular thing: to manage resources efficiently.”

No matter what evidence the inspector general turns up, he said, it’s ultimately up to the agencies to hold employees accountable.

“At the end of the day, an IG may recommend a course of action, but the IG has no power to make it happen,” he said. “An IG warns, reports, and recommends, but agency managers administer disciplinary actions and make changes in the agency.”

Pete Sepp, executive vice president of the National Taxpayers Union, said there is no doubt that downtime contributes to federal workplace misconduct.

“There’s a reason that saying about idle hands has such a long lineage,” Mr. Sepp said. “Not everyone with excess time in the workplace will spend it helping their colleagues get caught up or knitting clothes for the less fortunate,” he said.

“There needs to be a balanced approach to reform here, one that provides more flexibility to reassign workers’ duties, aggressive enforcement of whistleblower protections, incentives for agencies and managers that save tax dollars, and penalties for those that fail to properly oversee them,” Mr. Sepp said.

Some administration officials have come under criticism for allowing workers to remain on the job even in the face of clear misconduct findings.

In March, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee railed against the Environmental Protection Agency for not firing several employees involved in misconduct investigations. The employees included a senior executive who investigators said hired friends and family and sold weight loss products from the office.

The Washington Times reported on other time and attendance issues at HUD this year. One case involved an auditor who worked on private business from the office and later said work sometimes was impossible because the department’s computers were frequently down.

Homeland Security official arrested in sting involving sordid Sacramento Craigslist ad, By Bill Lindelof


Homeland Security official arrested in sting involving sordid Sacramento Craigslist ad
By Bill Lindelof
blindelof@sacbee.com
Published: Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014 - 1:17 pm


A Homeland Security employee has been arrested in connection with a sting that alleges he used a Craigslist ad in an effort to get a mother and an underage daughter to have sex with him.


George Hristovski, 54, of Elverta, was booked into Sacramento County Jail on Monday after his arrest by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. His LinkedIn posting identifies him as an inspector for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

A federal court filing requesting an arrest warrant for Hristovski said that Placer County Sheriff’s Department detectives noticed an ad on Craigslist on July 14 in the “Casual Encounters” section of the Sacramento area part of the website.

The person who placed the ad sought a mother who wanted a man to teach a daughter about sex. Detectives, posing as a mother and a 13-year-old daughter, corresponded via e-mails with the person who took out the ad.

The correspondence from the man, later identified as Hristovski in the arrest warrant request, became increasingly lurid. During the course of the e-mails, the man switched to an e-mail address he would use many times.

Based on the conversations, a Placer County detective obtained a search warrant for records from Craigslist and Yahoo. An investigation of internet provider addresses led detectives to believe Hristovski was the man who had solicited an online sexual liaison with a mother and daughter.

The online jail booking said Hristovski was booked on federal child pornography charges. The FBI declined to comment.

Legalizing child pornography is linked to lower rates of child sex abuse, by Brain & Behavior

Legalizing child pornography is linked to lower rates of child sex abuse, by Brain & Behavior
Legalizing child pornography is linked to lower rates of child sex abuse, by Brain & Behavior

Sexting may be driving rise in children charged with pornography offences, by Helen Davidson


Sexting may be driving rise in children charged with pornography offences
Helen Davidson

Call for national response after threefold rise in children charged with child pornography offences in South Australia since 2009


State police forces have issued warnings to teenagers and parents about the potential consequences of sexting – including legal ramifications. Photograph: Alex Segre/Alamy


A threefold increase in the number of South Australian children charged with child pornography offences has prompted the state attorney general John Rau to seek a national response to what he believes could be the cause: a rise in sexting between teenagers and children.

Since 2009, the number of children under 18 charged with child pornography offences in South Australia has risen from 15 per year to 44. A further breakdown of the data is not available but Rau and South Australian police believe it may be linked to an anecdotal rise in sexting – sending explicit images via phone – among children.

Under current South Australian law, children can be convicted and placed on the child sex offenders register, although the attorney’s general office said this has not yet happened.

“It would have an impact on the nature of their employment, ability to travel, as well as where they could reside and who they could associate with,” Rau told Guardian Australia, adding that a judge may find it necessary in some cases.

Rau is calling for a multi-government response, including education campaigns targeted at parents and children, and has written to his interstate and federal counterparts encouraging them to address the issue at the next state and territory attorneys-general meeting.

“Ideally, a national approach to this issue would be preferred as there are complexities involving telecommunications law which can only be dealt with federally,” he said.

Over recent years, numerous state police forces have issued warnings to teenagers and parents about the potential consequences of sexting – including legal ramifications.

In 2012, WA police warned that children engaging in sexting may be committing an offence under a number of child pornography laws, many of which carry a maximum of 10 years jail. Similar laws are in place in other states.

NSW attorney general Greg Smith told Guardian Australia that he supports Rau’s initiative in raising the issue.

“With the increased use of technology by young people, the practice of sexting anecdotally appears to be widespread,” said Smith.

“In NSW this does not appear to have led to a significant increase in charges, and police retain discretion. However, I would be concerned if there is evidence innocent adolescent behaviour was routinely criminalised, leaving a young person with life-long consequences.”

In NSW, around four people under 18 have been charged with offences relating to child abuse material or child pornography each year since 2009. The charges may be related to a number of criminal acts, including sexting.

In 2010, the state’s Crimes Act was changed so that related crimes are no longer referred to as “child pornography”, as the language was thought to be inaccurate.

“The NSW Crimes Act has been changed to refer to it all as child abuse material. It’s not pornography, it’s a crime,” detective inspector Michael Haddow, manager of the child exploitation internet unit at the NSW police sex crimes squad, told Guardian Australia.

Haddow said young people need to be aware that when they engage in “sexting” they are committing an offence and could be subject to charge, although he believed that would be rare as NSW police have alternative options to deal with young offenders, including cautions and conferencing with police.

“The more important message is that young people need to be aware of this because when you send images of yourself, whether by email or social media, they are out there and out there for good,” said Haddow.

New Victorian laws are expected to come in some time this year after the state government agreed in December to change its legislation and to make non-consensual distribution of explicit images an offence, and to ensure that children would not be charged.

The modifications – a national first – were the result of a parliamentary inquiry into sexting, and give children a defence against charges if they were sexting with someone of no more than two years’ difference in age.

A new summary offence will also be enacted of forwarding an intimate image without consent, which seeks to address incidents of jilted partners forwarding messages in apparent revenge.

Coalition MP Clem Newton-Brown, chair of the Victorian parliament’s law reform committee, told Guardian Australia very few children have been convicted of offences, unless it was warranted by aggravated circumstances.

“The evidence from Victoria was that police were exercising their discretion widely,” he said, however “the committee and now the government thinks that now it’s appropriate there be defences so that children who are caught sexting are not at the mercy of a policeman’s discretion.”

Rau told Guardian Australia he would like to see the outcomes of Victoria’s approach, but “we need to be very careful that any loosening of the legislation does not allow more serious offenders off the hook.”

Sunday, August 17, 2014

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

NCMEC are Fat Cats that will not investigate your missing child!
Make no doubt about it. NCMEC is a government front that exaggerates claims about what they do, statistics about success rates and their self-proclaimed nobility. Celebrities have come to their side to voice their support for NCMEC and if you like to drink from the Kool Aid, you will get poisoned also. The simple question is where are the children? Just ask the hundreds or thousands of parents who reported to NCMEC and ask them where their children are today?


The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, NCMEC, was created out of the publicity generated from the Adam Walsh disappearance and death back in 1981. The claim raised at the time before Congress was that there was no government-affiliated agency in existence to assist the parents of abducted children. The figures at the time portrayed the situation as grim, insisting that tens, if not hundreds of thousands of children a year were abducted by strangers. As it turned out, long-term abductions by strangers figured only in the tens per year. Since its inception, NCMEC has received millions of dollars each year from Congress. Presently, Congress allocates $50 million per year to the Center. But how is the money used? And how does NCMEC work? NCMEC describes itself as a Missing Children Clearinghouse, meaning that it disseminates information, but plays no active role in the actual recovery of missing children. Today, NCMEC has hundreds of staff and its salaries alone are running close to $30 million a year.

But what does it do? Well, it gathers information and disseminates it. Does this help when a child goes missing? Perhaps, but not significantly. Basically, what happens is that NCMEC posts a photo of the child on their website. They have partner programs with Wal-Mart and with ADVO to distribute photos of parentally abducted children, which have been successful to a small degree. But what about those few children that are actually in peril; the ones that Congress originally intended a national missing children center to be structured for; the kids like Adam Walsh? The answer is, not a whole lot of help gets channeled from NCMEC.

Take the case of Shawn Hornbeck, who had been abducted by a stranger for four years. Or that of Shasta Groene, the little girl, who was abducted after her whole family was murdered. Or Elizabeth Smart, who was with her kidnapper less than a quarter of a mile away from her house with a clear trail any competent bloodhound handler could find. Where was NCMEC then? Nowhere to be found. Does America Need a $50 Million a Year Missing Children Clearinghouse……or, rather, a $50 Million a Year Missing Children Emergency/Ongoing Response Team?

The National Center For Missing & Exploited Children is a private and conservatively funded front organization that works hand in hand with the corporate media to exploit the fear for one’s children in order to help get laws passed which are fully unconstitutional. They are secretive about their operations and routinely refuse to even cite their data sources as they spread false and misleading statistical information to a nervous but clueless public. What is most startling is the seemingly limitless connections this organization has, despite their secretive nature.

They seem to have instant access to nearly any politician or corporate television program, and no journalists ever look into the group itself, but merely parrot the misleading information and often false statistics passed along to them. CNN and Oprah are notorious for doing this, and yet they reach such an unbelievably wide audience that it’s as though what the NCMEC says simply becomes fact when spread through these media outlets, with nobody bothering to verify anything.

It’s as though the claim that they stand for defenseless children somehow excludes them from scrutiny, but their clear involvement in political matters and influencing of the legal system begs some real investigative journalism. To the journalists who try, don’t be surprised when you hit a few walls. NCMEC is nothing more than a patriarchal organization designed to control women who leave a situation where they are being dominated and by doing so, it sends a message to other women caught in an abusive relationship, that they had better not leave or their abuser will hunt them down like dogs with the assistance of Ernie Allen and the justice departments in various countries.

I feel this is an assault on the rights of women and of course, most especially on mothers who are raising the next generation. For me, this is a straightforward attempt to silence women and the women’s movement through the re-victimization of the most vulnerable. If NCMEC’s Going to try to regulate the Internet for Child Porn, It Should At Least Be Subject to FOIA. NCMEC’s job is simply too important to be entrusted to a nonprofit group–such a task can only be performed by a fully trained and funded law enforcement agency (one, which conveniently enough, is subject to the Freedom of Information Act, congressional oversight, and constitutional requirements for due process.)

Congress is unlikely to address the problem of NCMEC’s accountability given the sensitivity of the issue of child protection. But, fortunately, we live in a republic, not a pure democracy: Our third branch of government, the judicial branch, exists to enforce the rule of law; being somewhat insulated from political pressure, the courts provide a final check on the authority even of the almighty NCMEC. So it’s never been high on the Obama administration’s list of czarist reforms. But simply by ordering NCMEC to comply with FOIA, the Lazaridis court http://about.bloomberglaw.com/law-reports/district-court/) could, with the stroke of a pen, bring accountability to NCMEC’s law enforcement functions.

The legal question is simple: Does NCMEC qualify as an “agency,” which FOIA defines as an “authority of the Government of the United States?” If so, NCMEC must not only respond to requests for certain of its “records,” but it must also follow a rule-making process akin to that required of federal agencies when they make policy decisions, offering the public appropriate notice and the opportunity to comment on proposed regulations—instead of, say, threatening Internet companies behind closed doors (sometimes the same companies that later make generous donations to NCMEC) or cutting deals with state attorneys general. It turns out that this is not a new issue.

Federal courts have had to decide whether a number of quasi-governmental entities qualify as “agencies” over the years, especially given the trend towards privatization over the last three decades. Some organizations, like the Smithsonian Institution, have decided to comply with FOIA even though courts have held that they’re not required to do so. NCMEC could have allayed all these concerns years ago by doing the same thing, but absent a change in management at the organization, it seems only a court order will force the organization to open its “black box” of decision-making to public inquiry. In a number of other circumstances, courts have required nominally private organizations to comply with the federal FOIA or its state equivalents. A thorough (if dated) treatment of this issue can be found in the 1999 law review article, Privatization and the Freedom of Information Act: An Analysis of Public Access to Private Entities Under Federal Law by Craig Feiser, Florida’s deputy solicitor general and an adjunct at FSU Law. Feiser explains: When Congress amended FOIA in 1974, it added section 552(f)(1) and broadened the definition of “agency” to include entities not explicitly mentioned under the APA, but which “perform governmental functions and control information of interest to the public.”

In deciding whether a private organization qualifies as an agency subject to FOIA, courts have considered two factors. One factor asks whether the entity has substantial independent authority in performing a function of the government, making it the functional equivalent of the government. The other factor asks whether the government substantially controls the entity’s day-to-day operations or organizational framework. In using either factor, the court is essentially asking to what degree the entity is performing a government function.

In one case, the government is pulling nearly all of the strings; in the other case, the entity is making decisions independently for the government. Financially, NCMEC is largely a creature of government: 70% of NCMEC’s $42 million budget in 2007 came from the government. But as Feiser notes, funding does not always mean control. Government control over NCMEC’s internal decisions is unclear. Indeed, the very lack of government control over an organization essentially regulating the Internet and imposing criminal sanctions that could follow convicted “sex offenders” for life would by itself be an enormous problem.

But given what NCMEC actually does, it obviously qualifies as an “agency” subject to FOIA under the “functional equivalence factor,” which as Feiser explains, basically represents the opposite situation from the control factor. Here, the entity is functioning independently, but making decisions for the government, as opposed to having its decisions made by the government. In effect, it is the functional equivalent of the federal government, and, therefore, it should be an “agency” under the FOIA. I am hoping that the court sees NCMEC for what it is: a private organization tasked with implementing not just any government function, but the enforcement of laws against the most vulnerable victims in society. Absent such a recognition, NCMEC will continue to grow into an unaccountable regulator for the Internet.

Today, the only public oversight of NCMEC required by law is the requirement that NCMEC (like any non-profit with federal tax-exempt 501(c)(3) non-profit status) file a Form 990 each year disclosing basic information about its finances. That report does not list NCMEC’s donors, because donors have a First Amendment right to remain anonymous, but a more transparent organization would, like my own think tank, at least identify its major donors. NCMEC’s CEO, Ernie Allen, was paid $359,191 plus $411,636 in benefits in 2006 (PDF p. 46) and $409,821 plus $426,540 in benefits in 2007 (PDF p. 19), for a total of $1.6 million in two years (roughly $800,000/year); I’d be reluctant to suggest that anyone at NCMEC was more interested in money than in protecting children, but if given the choice, we’d all prefer to do well while doing good. So if Allen were smart, he’d realize that a court order subjecting NCMEC to FOIA might be the best of all possible worlds: Requiring real accountability would neutralize calls for nationalizing NCMEC, allowing the organization to continue operating as a non-profit that can pay quite a bit better than the Federal civil service. Even the Senior Executive Service, for agency heads, maxes out at a measly $197,000/year.

Of course, if NCMEC’s records and decisions were subject to FOIA, the organization might not be able to convince any companies or Corporate America to essentially to write large checks to NCMEC. But even this tax-hating libertarian would be hard-pressed to argue against funding the enforcement of laws against child pornography, abduction and exploitation with taxpayer dollars. I can’t help but wonder how many more agents the FBI could employ to combat child porn with an extra $1.6 million/year in funding (the salary of Allen and NCMEC’s top-five highest paid employees). It seems that FBI agents today make roughly $48,000-87,000/year. Let’s call it an average of $67,500 and throw in 20% for overhead. That works out to $81,000/year—or: 20 new agents for what NCMEC is paying its top six employees; or 368 new agents for the $29.82 million NCMEC received in government support in 2007. http://www.wearenotmissing.com/responsefromthencmec.htm FBI agents today make roughly $52,000-89,000/year. Let’s call it an average of $70,000 and throw in 20% for overhead. That works out to $84,000/year—or: 20 new agents for what NCMEC is paying its top six employees; or 398 new agents for the $35.82 million NCMEC received in government support in 2012.

I’m certain that the solution is far more complicated than simply hiring more FBI agents, and that NCMEC does any good work in the service of a noble cause. There are local, state and some federal agencies that claim they make a dent in the investigation and recovery of missing children and should not be excluded from the merit of their accomplishments. I credit any law enforcement for their efforts. However, the conception of a family running to the police for the sake to filing a police report which is actually an incident report for the most part and then running over to NCMEC will most often never be of any consequence or investigation resulting in the return of a missing child. It is grossly misleading.

The big picture here and the reality is that every 5 minutes, a child goes missing and the clock starts ticking. Action is required and if you think like NCMEC and the follow police protocols like taking a missing persons reports, talking to all of your child’s friends, their family members, combing the neighborhood, your child’s schools, hangouts hospitals, driving the streets, bus stations, train stations only will make you all the more hysterical and waste precious time. NCMEC admits in its tax returns as having in overages in the bank. Yet in its more than a quarter century of history, whenever a child has been abducted and faces death, the NCMEC has not offered one cent as a reward. What does that say about those that run it?

Their NetSmartz website is probably worth another $25,000, but that’s a one-time expense. And their Cybertip hotline for the online sexual enticement of minors could be run for pennies. Why? Because the information collected is simply redirected to the FBI. NCMEC does not investigate. In 1984, Thursday’s Child sited a girl believed to be Kimberly Doss, a missing child then listed with
NCMEC. However, due to stonewalling by NCMEC and that time working with Children of the Night, local police authorities were persuaded to drop their search for the girl, who was in plain sight with her pimp. It was only years later that NCMEC admitted their error and now gives her the street name she used at the time of Kimberly Gardner. Doss was never seen again. The NCMEC (color) photo tends to look more like comedian, David Steinberg, than anything Kimberly Doss might resemble should she be alive today.

The police enhancement is probably a far more accurate portrayal. In fact, when abducted Shawn Hornbeck was found by accident, he turned out to look nothing like NCMEC’s age-progressed photo. The age-progressed photo of Hornbeck shows him to be more of a Ben Affleck type. Yet Hornbeck turned out to look more like Elijah Wood.

The fact of the matter is that only a handful of children like Jaycee are abducted each year and an annual budget of $50 million dollars (NCMEC also gets an additional $8 million from private sources) is more than enough to further any search. As it turned out, though, Jaycee and the other were just poster children for Congressional waste. NCMEC also does age progressions. Yet compare their age progression of Kimberly Doss with that done by Texas Police.

So, when the $50 million a year puts up a poster where the photo is totally wrong, aren't the effects actually counterproductive to any recovery? No one would have recognized Shawn Hornbeck even if they had seen him in person, because he didn't look like NCMEC said he should. And what about Jaycee? While she was imprisoned in her captor’s back yard, living as his sex slave from age 11, bearing two of his children, never seeing the outside world, never being allowed to experience childhood, NCMEC was raking in nearly half a billion dollars from Congress, while their President, Ernie Allen kicked back in a swell home and shook the hand of the United States President that led our nation into ruin. Why didn't NCMEC search out all the pedophiles in the area where Jaycee Dugard was abducted?
Why did they not hire one private investigator to continue the search?
Why did they not use Bloodhounds in any of these cases where a discovery could have been made immediately?
Why did they not offer a reward for her recovery?
Why are they not listed with directory services?
Why don’t they have 24-hour critical staff?
Why does no one notice?

While Jaycee was wasting away and lost her childhood, NCMEC was raking in nearly half a billion dollars from Congress. Why didn’t NCMEC search out all the pedophiles in the area where Jaycee Dugard was abducted?· Why didn’t they hire one private investigator to continue the search?· Why didn’t they offer a reward for her recovery?· Why aren’t they listed with directory services? Is there any red flags, indicative behavioral signs that might lead to your children to runaway away or feel isolated enough to look for attention from a stranger on social media and fall prey to a predator? If NCMEC’s Going to Regulate the Internet for Child Porn, It Should At Least Be Subject to FOIA

If so, NCMEC must not only respond to requests for certain of its “records,” but it must also follow a rule-making process akin to that required of federal agencies when they make policy decisions, offering the public appropriate notice and the opportunity to comment on proposed regulations—instead of, say, threatening Internet companies behind closed doors (sometimes the same companies that later make generous donations to NCMEC) or cutting deals with state attorneys general. Until NCMEC is either nationalized as a direct arm of law enforcement or made significantly more accountable as a private organization, we won’t really have any way of knowing whether the money being spent on NCMEC is being spent in the most effective manner possible to deal with the problems of child pornography, abduction and exploitation. We also won’t know whether draconian alternatives to direct enforcement (e.g., hiring more FBI agents) like network-level filtering mandates are truly necessary, despite their unintended consequences for the free speech and privacy rights of law-abiding Internet users.

There is a cause to end worthless spending in this country that is part of our fiscal end and part of our economic crisis. It is also another part of the corrupt political system where bystanders takes no action and let perpetrators allow crimes to be committed and predators to repeat their offenses. In this particular case, this is not just a major financial case of white collar crime of epidemic proportions but the great loss of innocent lives. Children are our greatest resource. To trivialize human life and take advantage of this the pain, angst , peril, frustration and desperation of the families of the lost is abhorrent. To divide the families from their loved ones and outright misrepresenting an organization and stealing money from the government and the public is simply a scheme no different than a grifter.

One of many complaints I also get, is the posturing of racism and why one’s child is not deserving of the attention of another. That emotional nature is grief talking but one that also has merit. if you take a hard line approach at NCMEC and look at their flyers which most often if not all the times offer no reward for information leading to the whereabouts of the children, what does that tell you? We know that they are properly funded, so why no reward? Where is the incentive? Is it because of the huge benefits that are paid to Allen and the employees of NCMEC are the reward?

If you look at the r\missing flyers of the children, why is there only one photo of a black child and several of a white child. Why is there more descriptions in the flyer of a white child? When it comes to catching the eye of the media, have you ever seen a black child disappearance case covered extensively? How about just one time?

The photos that appear in this blog are all high profile cases where a sea of law enforcement did not solve them. It took a sea of media to follow the case and put it out to the public who solved the mystery but law enforcement still took the credit. What happened to those less fortunate did that did not receive the attention from the press? How many families are grieving each and everyday about their loved children?

Families are clinging onto the steps that law enforcement taught them and NCMEC advised them but neither of the two took the time to investigate their child’s whereabouts. The first 5 hours is crucial to children of the ages of infancy to 5 years of age. Then it is of utmost importance from the ages of 6-12 hours for the ages of 6-11 years of age. From 12-18 years of age, you have at best 12-48 hours and perhaps in remote cases where they are abducted they can become victims of human trafficking and every minute can equal a mile that separates you from your child.

Either way, the clock ticks, and the chances of finding them dead or alive are precious. There are thousands of cold cases out there simply because they were never investigated or they were mishandled. NCMEC is getting FAT and simply not helping grieving families find their children. The government is part of the problem also and not part of the solution. If you want to find a missing child who is in eminent danger, you MUST hire a professional with a proven track record and not waste valuable time.

No flyers or candle vigils in the world will bring back your child. The wait and see approach is a disservice to your and most important your child who is crying out for help. The police cannot leave their jurisdiction so if the FBI will not take your case, the likelihood of any qualified law enforcement agency of even looking into your matter is about 1%. If you want to gamble of those odds, that will be the percentage of ever seeing your child again. www.thelost.net

Friday, August 15, 2014

Suicides so far in 2014 involving Child Porn


     Suicides so far in 2014 involving Child Porn
Stories posted are written by National news Journalists, not by this blog. The Journalist's name and "Source" link follow each story. The blog http://on-suicides-deaths.blogspot.com/ merely creates "Tags" based on facts from the article. Tags are used for later retrieval, if someone wants to see all cases grouped by a tag (Click tag of choice). Tags are at the top of every story. Our Blog Tips


Wednesday, August 13, 2014


8-11-2014 Nebraska:

ADAMS COUNTY, Neb. -- Adams County Jail Officials have identified a 39-year-old Hastings inmate that died while in-custody.

Officials discovered the body of Matthew Arterburn around 6:30 a.m. Saturday morning in a cell. Adams County Sheriff Greg Magee reports the death does not appear to be from natural causes.

Records show that Arterburn started serving a sentence for child pornography charges in the Adams County Jail on July 15, 2014.

The Nebraska State Patrol is investigating the death. ..Source.. by 1011.com

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Monday, June 16, 2014

6-10-2014 Georgia:

WALTON COUNTY- The search for a suspected child pornographer ended today in Walton County.

Walton County Sheriff's Deputies found 47-year old Jonathan Douglas Hensley dead of an apparent gunshot wound in a wooded area off Woodland Bayou Drive in Santa Rosa Beach.

They say they found a handgun near his body.

Family members reported Hensley missing on June 3rd.

He was arrested in May on 30 counts of child pornography.

Investigators say they found more than 2,000 images on his computer of children engaged in sex acts.

The medical examiner's office will perform an autopsy to determine the exact cause of death. ..Source.. by WJHG.com

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Thursday, May 8, 2014

5-8-2014 Florida:

A man wanted on multiple out-of- state warrants for possession of child pornography died Wednesday of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound after members of the U.S. Marshals Service Regional Fugitive Task Force arrived at a Crestview hotel to take him into custody.

The Task Force members, including deputies from the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office, were called out to the Holiday Inn Express at 125 Cracker Barrel Road in Crestview early Wednesday morning.

The suspect, considered armed and dangerous, was believed to be hiding out in a room at the hotel. Task Force members knocked on his door shortly before 2 a.m. and announced their presence. As they were attempting to enter the room, they heard a single gunshot. 45 year old Richard Allen Garretson of Huntington West Virginia was found wounded inside and pronounced dead a short time later by EMS personnel.

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Monday, May 5, 2014

5-3-2014 Oklahoma:

It happened in south Broken Arrow Friday night into Saturday morning

Broken Arrow, Okla. — A man suspected of child pornography and sexual abuse killed himself after a standoff with police in Broken Arrow early Saturday morning.

Maj. Mark Irwin with Broken Arrow police tells KRMG the incident started around 10 p.m., in a neighborhood near West Jasper St. and South Aspen Ave., (!45h E. Ave. and 131st St.).

Detectives served a search warrant for child abuse, child sex abuse, and child pornography on John Murray Jr.'s home after a family member approached them with evidence.

Irwin said detectives served the warrant after hours because of the fear that Murray might destroy evidence.

"The situation developed rapidly," he said.

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Tuesday, April 1, 2014

4-1-2014 Washington:

BREMERTON — The body found floating near the Bremerton Marina Tuesday was identified as a high-profile Belfair man charged with possession of child pornography last week.

Frank Edward McDonald, 52, apparently killed himself, according to a statement from the Bremerton Police Department.

He was released from the Mason County Jail on Friday without bail following a hearing before Superior Court Judge Toni Sheldon.

McDonald’s body was recovered by Bremerton police and fire department along with Navy personnel at around 11:30 a.m.

McDonald was a volunteer fire captain and an elected commissioner of Mason County Public Hospital District No. 2.

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Tuesday, March 25, 2014

3-25-2014 Missouri:

BLUE SPRINGS, Missouri — Authorities in western Missouri say a man found dead inside his submerged car was being investigated for crimes related to child pornography.

A witness called the Jackson County Sheriff's Office around noon Tuesday after seeing a car speed into Lake Jacomo (jah-COH'-moh). Divers from the Lee's Summit Underwater Recovery team helped pull the vehicle from the water.

The county medical examiner concluded the driver had committed suicide, based on what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his head. Authorities later learned the man was being investigated by the multi-county Western Missouri Cyber Crimes Task Force in connection with child pornography.

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Friday, March 21, 2014

3-19-2014 Ohio:

A Granville man indicted Feb. 27 on multiple counts of having child pornography was rushed to the hospital Feb. 28 and died Monday from his apparent self-inflicted injuries.

Tyler C. Grossett, 27, last known address 560 Jones Road, was indicted as a result of a Central Ohio task force investigation of Internet crimes against children in late 2012, Licking County Prosecutor Ken Oswalt said.

According to his death notice, he was at the Selma Markowitz Care Center, operated by Hospice of Central Ohio, at the time of his death.

At 11:55 a.m. Feb. 28, a Granville Township Fire Department ambulance was called to Grossett’s Jones Road address regarding a reported overdose.

Granville Police Department Sgt. Keith Blackledge said the case is still open while officials await an autopsy report, but he could confirm suicide. Blackledge said the original report to Jones Road was an attempted suicide for an unresponsive person.

Oswalt said that to his knowledge Grossett had been in medical treatment since the day of his apparent overdose and he had never regained consciousness.

According to Licking County Sheriff Randy Thorp, deputies tried to serve the summons on the indictment to Grossett late in the morning Feb. 28, but were unable to make contact and left a standard note on the door to contact the office.

Before the indictment, the task force executed a search warrant at Grossett’s home and seized a computer that allegedly had “tens of thousands” of suspected images of child pornography, Oswalt said.

An investigation was ongoing for about a year to try to determine how many of the images actually constituted child pornography and the case was handed over to the Licking County Prosecutor’s Office in January.

Grossett was indicted on five fourth-degree felony counts of pandering sexually oriented matter involving a minor Feb. 27 by a grand jury. He was scheduled to have an initial bond hearing Tuesday in Licking County Common Pleas Court. ..Source.. by Advocate staff

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Monday, March 10, 2014

3-6-2013 Texas:

A 12-page document released by U.S. District Court Thursday is shedding new light on the case of an inmate who committed suicide in the LCS Detention Facility near Robstown.

It was Saturday when 26-year old Trevor Nash, a second lieutenant in the U.S. Marines, committed suicide by hanging himself with a bed sheet. He was arrested by U.S. Marshals on Feb. 27.

According to the criminal complaint filed by the FBI, Nash was arrested for obtaining and distributing child pornography. The investigation dates back to May of 2013 while Nash was a pilot-in-training at Naval Air Station-Corpus Christi.

The 12-page document outlines the FBI's investigation into Nash's alleged child porn habits. The evidence included online conversations using several different chat sites, including Yahoo Messenger.

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Thursday, March 6, 2014

3-5-2014 California:

A cold case murder suspect identified through fingerprint and DNA evidence was found dead days after learning that he'd been linked to the crime.

Police told The San Francisco Chronicle (http://bit.ly/1caiqan) that 48-year-old Robert Hathaway hanged himself on Tuesday, four days after Fairfield police interviewed him about the killing and collected a DNA sample.

Hathaway was a suspect in the Aug. 31, 1983 murder and sexual assault of 40-year-old Priscilla Strole. The victim's 15-year-old son found Strole's body.

Police ran fingerprints and DNA from the crime scene through a new law enforcement database this year, and obtained a match for Hathaway, who was 17 at the time and a friend of the victim's son.

Hathaway in 1986 was arrested for burglary and his prints were entered into a database. ..Source.. by PressDemocrate

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Tuesday, March 4, 2014

3-1-2014 Florida:

A former Tyndall airman, who pled guilty on child pornography possession charges in September, is dead.

Investigators arrested 30-year old Daniel Freiwald in July after tracing pornography internet downloads to his computer. He pled guilty to the federal charges last fall.

Federal Judge Richard Smoak sentenced him last month to 8-years in a federal prison. Wednesday authorities transferred Freiwald to the Federal Detention Center in Tallahassee, on his way to a federal prison.

But, Thursday he reportedly committed suicide.

Officials at the detention center refused to discuss the case.

But the Federal Bureau of Prisons' Inmate Locator website lists Freiwald's status as deceased. ..Source..by

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Friday, January 24, 2014

1-24-2014 Maryland:

The former chief of staff to Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) who was arrested on child pornography charges last month has been found dead in a suicide.

Jesse Ryan Loskarn, 35, hanged himself in his parents' house in Sykesville, Md., according to a spokesperson for Maryland's office of the chief medical examiner.

Authorities found Loskarn's body on Thursday after responding to a call at approximately 12 p.m., according to a statement from the Carroll County Sheriff's Department.

A preliminary investigation indicated that Loskarn had committed suicide, and the body was then transported to the State Medical Examiner’s Office for an autopsy.

Loskarn had been released into his parents’ custody in mid-December after being charged with possession and distribution of child pornography. Prosecutors had until Feb. 10 to formally indict Loskarn in the case. 

At a hearing in December, Loskarn was confined to his parents’ home, where he was banned from using any electronic device that could allow him to access the Internet. Loskarn was ordered to be under high-intensity supervision during his release and was required to wear an electronic monitoring device.

Prosecutors had argued against Loskarn’s release, warning there was no way to ensure he did not have access to the Internet and that he was at risk of fleeing or harming himself.

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Thursday, January 23, 2014

1-17-2014 Virginia:

Chesapeake, Va. - SWAT teams used an armored vehicle to get closer to a Shelview Circle home on Friday.

They tried for several hours to make contact with a man inside, but when they repeatedly got no response, they finally went inside just before 3 p.m. to find him dead.

“It’s definitely scary. Nobody wants to see this in their neighborhood. Nobody wants to see this anywhere,” commented a neighbor.

Police say they went to the home to execute a search warrant for child pornography around 9:30 this morning.

They say they heard what sounded like a gunshot as they approached the front door.

That’s when they decided to call in the swat team.

“What I know now is that this is stemming from an investigation that was initiated in November. Again, we don’t have any arrest warrants on file at this point. It’s just an investigation. We were going in for property,” says Kelly O’Sullivan with the Chesapeake Police Department.

Officers say they don’t know if the man found dead is the suspect in the child pornography case.

Forensics crews and detectives will now go inside the home to start their investigation. ..Source.. by NewsChannel3